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Accompanying torrential thunder storms. Fortunately the storms veered north thus sparing the runners the additional agony of washed out trails, streams turned

1997 Mohican – Hot!

By Colleen J. Theusch

ctheusch@core.com

The word for the 1997 Mohican is HOT! Other words are mosquitoes and hamburger feet. As darkness fell, the weather service issued warnings of 60 plus mile winds accompanying torrential thunder storms. Fortunately the storms veered north thus sparing the runners the additional agony of washed out trails, streams turned into rivers, blinding rain, etc.

The MedCentral Health Systems helicopter and rescue squad ambulance at the Mohican Wilderness campground during race check-in signaled the special flavor of the 1997 event. Loudonville and Perrysville Emergency Medical Services latched on to the excitement of this annual event to kick-off a “Vacation Safety Awareness” campaign which will also raise money to purchase an emergency inflatable rescue boat, emergency education equipment, etc.

This resulted in a great win-win situation. The Mohican 100 mile trail race and the safety awareness program received much publicity through newspaper articles before, during, and after the race. On-site local radio station coverage at the fire tower on Saturday morning and again at the campground at the end of the race along with live progress updates thoughout the race generated interest which kept listeners tuned to the safety messages. The race benefitted from the publicity. EMS crews in ambulances stationed at aid stations enhanced the medical coverage which Dr. Mark Elderbrock provides each year. Runners did not receive request for pledges or donations while race officials and volunteers had no extra workload. Moreover a monetary contribution was made to the Mohican 100 mile event.

Each runner has an objective for entering an ultra. It may be to complete a distance for the first time, to set a record, to make a PR for the distance, to train for another event, just to enjoy the event.

Keith Hileman set the men’s master’s record in 1992. Hileman had taken a hiatus from 100 mile events since his knee surgery about four years ago. He was back with a vengeance this year leading the pack during the first quarter of the race with a pace to break his own record. Then stomach problems struck and forced him out before the half way mark.

Cliff Treyens had his own secret agenda. At the lower master’s age range, he intended to claim that master’s record. He was familiar with the course from previous events and had trained well. He had calculated the aid station splits needed to break the record. He ran according to plan for 47 miles. Then a severely pulled calf muscle plagued him. While he could walk, he could not push off. Rather than attempt to finish the race and risk serious injury, he chose the prudent course. His first DNF. Record breaking must wait for next year.

Terry Hawk had a three pronged objective for the event: to run a good safe race, to have an Ohioan win the event, to finish under 19 hours. During the first quarter of the race Terry ran third within 10 minutes of the leaders Pennsylvanian Hileman fellow Ohioan Treyens. After Keith’s DNF, Terry continued in second place within 10 minutes of Cliff until his muscle misfortune. Not only did Terry become the first Ohioan to win the race, he also achieved an even better record than his hoped for sub-nineteen hour pace with a finish just seconds under 18 hours. This is an improvement of an hour and 50 minutes over last year and also the second fastest time ever set on the course. Though his time is less than Hileman’s record, that record holds since Hawk is only 39. Next year anyone?

Johnny Price, the “Last of thhe Mohicans” stands at the other end of the spectrum with a time of 29:45:40. Price’s attempt in the 1996 Mohican ended when he failed to meet a cut-off time at an aid station. This year two-thirds into the race he was two hours ahead of the cut-off pace. OW! A twisted ankle! DNF? No, continue slowly, with much walking. Johnny made the 93 and 97 mile cut-offs with only seven minutes to spare. Amazingly he picked up pace to finish with almost a quarter hour to spare. Price’s achievement is particularly notable because his time becomes the 70+ record since no one over 70 had ever finished this race previously.

Edith Bogenhuber knew that she had a good shot at setting the women’s grand master’s (50+) record. Her 22:20:47 cut a whopping 5 hours from Terri Haqyes 1995 record. This becomes a solid record which will be hard to topple. Finishing alongside Edith, Nicholas Bassett came within 10 minutes of breaking Don Hampton’s men’s grand master’s record also set in 1995.

In his first 100 mile event, Texan Ted Bidwell ran strong to gain second place in 20:18:33. The heat did not bother him, but the hills! “We don’t have hills like this in Texas.” On the most beautiful, most treacherous infamous blue loop, Ted missed his footing, became airborne, and landed prone. Luckily he landed on his thigh and not on a hip, thus incurring bruises rather than a break. When he next saw the river, he jumped in to eliminate the mud accumulated during that mishap. According to Ted, one of the best parts of the event was the camaraderie of all involved. Does he have a sense of humor? His reply to the podiatrist’s query, “Are you allergic to anything?” was “One hundred mile races?”

The camaraderie mentioned by Ted was expressed in action by many participants. Strangers who met on the course and bonded to help each other through the night. “I couldn’t have gotten through the forest without him. He had done it before, but slowed down to stick with me.” Cliff Treyens, who had dropped out, heard Ruta Mazelis mention her hot spots. He promptly took off his shoe and gave her his gel pack along with various nutritional supplements to sustain her in her quest for the buckle. Karen Standley stayed with Mike Cornelison who lay down at the side of the road when he realized that he was hyperventilating and near heat exhaustion. The onsite EMS crew promptly picked him up and after a few hours he was back to normal.

With his finish at this 8th Mohican 100 mile trail race, Robin Fry continues to be the only person who can say that he has finished all these events. He requested and received race number 8. Next year will be number 9. Robin’s time this year is understandably slower than his preceding finishes. He is now a full time student in a physician assistant program and thus cannot devote much time to training.

Mark Carroll and Steve Bush had run their first ultra together several years ago. Mohican became the proving ground for their first 100 mile trail race. Mark was wearing the angel pin of his recently deceased mother. At Turkey Ridge 88 mile aid station, Beth Kalapos and Shelly Stimpf were first time volunteers. Concerned that Mark was the first runner to enter Turkey Ridge alone in the middle of the night, Beth and Shelly turned into live angels for Mark and ran him in. Mark’s flashlight dimmed while going up Big Hill – or is it the big mountain from HELL? Three flashlights at the bottom of the hill indicated that Mark’s finishing place was in jeopardy. Spare batteries were faulty. The three ran the rest of the way on one flashlight. With only two miles to go, another stop to adjust Mark’s pack revealed that the flashlight trio were getting closer. Mark’s trio left the pack for later pick-up and pushed to the finish just four minutes ahead of Rob Apple. Meanwhile, Mary Lou Frisch, taking a break from consecutive Mohican finishes, was crewing for several friends including Mark and Steve. She played the angelic role for Steve when he cramped badly. Steve knows that he can’t continue running after cramping. Mary Lou has her own methods – massage much vinegar into cramping muscles. Steve finished the race with over three hours to spare.

Besides Ted Bidwell, Mark Carroll and Steve Bush, other runners who completed and received the buckles for their first 100 mile trail run are Richard Barton, Pam Tegtmeier, Chris Kammler, Fenton Cross, and Russell Larson. The roster receiving the award medals for completing over 50 miles is: Joe Hildebrand, John Nichols, Margaret Schlundt, Stanley Duobinis, Claude Routin, Fred Davis, Tammy Krueger, Roy Heger, Jeffery Brown, Roger Ackerman, Dan Brown, John Goss, Paul Pelke, Mitch Harper, Sean Hurt, John Weitzel, Clement Choy, Dan Riggenbach, Richard Maloof, Harold Vergiels, Bill Piper, Ruta Mazelis, Joe Donahue, Don Baun, Herb Hedgecock, James Newman Sr., Bob Budzilek, Karen Standley, Ron Perkins, Jed Davis, Karen Guzik, and Leo Lightner.

Regis Shivers, veteran ultrarunner who frequently has completed this course rates it as very tough – hills, hills, and more hills. Tom Green, who back in 1986 became the the first person to do the Old Dominion, Western States, Leadville, and Wastch Grand Slam, rates it second to Massanutten in 100 mile events east of the Mississippi.

While the course is quite well marked and the markings are checked throughout the race, distraction can lead a runner off course. In most cases this results in additional milage as the runner realizes the off-course position and retraces steps to pick up the last known marking. In the case of Joe Hildebrand, his missed turn resulted in the shortening of the course as he soon was back on the marked course without realizing that he had ever left it. This was first noted by Terry Hawk who learned that though Joe had been at the 26 mile station when Terry left, Joe had entered the 32 mile station first without passing him. Later analysis of the time between these stations indicated that Joe had been on a short course rather than Terry on a long one between these stations. Upon viewing the statistics, Hildebrand, an honest gentleman, graciously concurred that the only solution was disqualification. Had he not missed the marking, his pace would have given him a solid second place finish with a projected time around 19:15. Hildebrand had a great almost 100 mile run, enjoyed the day, is without bitterness or rancor at others or himself, and expects to be back at Mohican.

Mitch Harper from Indiana is a new ultrarunner. He ran his first 50K in November, 1996. Bull Run in April this year beame his first 50 miler. In his attempt at the 100 miles, he reached 100K. This distance progression in less than a year is very commendable for a novice ultrarunner. His hundred miles may well be reached next year.

The extra EMS coverage during this year’s hot race provided rapid aid to a few participants. Roger Ackerman entered the bridle staging area aid station under his own power but in bad shape from dehydration. Oxygen and an IV soon stabilized him. After which he chose the prudent course – DNF. Roger sang praises for the care given him by Francine Greenwald, the aid station captain. Upon learning that she is a nurse, he stated, “That’s why she knew exactly what to do for me while we were waiting for the EMS to arrive.”

The fire tower? Art Moore had put that competition to rest last year with his ten climbs. However, Herb Hedgecock just had to climb the fire tower with David Hughes right behind him. “This is for you, Art.” Family commitments prevented Moore from being at Mohican this year.

The podiatric students at the covered bridge and finish pavilion had a field day with blisters and some other injuries. Runners requested Compeed to treat their own blisters and hot spots at some of the aid stations. Compeed for runners packets and aid stations had been donated by Bruder Healthcare Company. That company also donated Thxtra-P with which some runners alleviated sore muscles at the end of the race. Other sponsors provided nourishment in the form of Gatorade, Dex4 Glucose tablets, PowerBars, PR Nutrition bars, Brueggers bagels, Minnehaha spring water.

Race officials, medical personnel, radio operators, volunteers all have their stories and memories too. For some the event is over until next year. For others, the 1997 event must still be wrapped up, and the 1998 event must be started. Yes, now! First line of business is to get permits to insure our race dates at Mohican. Sponsors must be contacted soon, etc.

Accolades to all the volunteers! Runners constantly praised the efficiency, thoughtfulness, and cheerfulness of all. Some runners seemed amazed at the smoothness of the operation. “Someone always took my bottle and asked me what I needed as soon as I entered the station.” “They were marvelous.” “The camaraderie of volunteers and participants is outstanding.”

Many thanks to all who helped make this event a roaring success! Cleveland West Road Runners Club could not handle this event without the help of other running clubs, organizations, corporations, and many dedicated individuals from several states. Special thanks to all amateur radio operators whose communications support linking the command center to the aid stations is fantastic – improving yearly.

We hope to see all runners and volunteers back next year – as runners or volunteers. What will next year be like? Can’t tell now. It will be different. It will be wonderful! Come, see for yourself. Bring your friends along.Дадаць дакумент у свой блог ці на сайт 2010-07-19 18:44 Читать похожую статью
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